October 6, 2022

The thought of not having to go to work anymore might be tempting – but as anyone who’s come through lockdown will know, freedom can be a double-edged sword. Boredom can often follow close behind, so you should aim to see retirement not as the end of something, but as the start of something new.

The question is, what?  Read seven fun things below, curated by experts from online pokies Australia.

Visit the World’s Most Sacred Places

If you’ve always wanted to visit some of the earth’s most sacred, mysterious and wonderful spaces, Machu Picchu is a great place to start. Adios Adventure Travel offers trips to this sacred site that is an iconic location of the Inca civilization, and is willing to customize the trip to meet your needs. Also, you can go on day trips, cruises, travel to new countries, or visit each of the contiguous United states.

2 Step Out of Your Comfort Zone

Get out and do something that you have never done before. It doesn’t have to be something big, nor does it have to be expensive. Go to that new trendy coffee shop, drive to the next town and stroll in a new park, read a racy novel, anything that makes you feel alive and brings you the experience of new things. Master a foreign language online with a website like Duolingo, for example. Or why not up your computer skills or other skills you have always wanted to learn.

3 Learn New Hobbies in Retirement

Too numerous to mention all, but some choices are: drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, playing the piano or other musical instrument, singing, knitting, crocheting, needlepoint, quilting, scrapbooking, photography, gardening, cooking, woodworking, genealogy, crafting. Read this article about the variety of hobbies that women over 50 are participating in.

4 Declutter Your Home and Free Your Mind

Go through cupboards, wardrobes, drawers and desks – and while you’re at it, get up in the attic and sort out all those things you’ve been meaning to for years. Keep anything special (and enjoy some reminiscing) and sell or donate the rest. You’ll have peace of mind that all your possessions are in order and that you’ve got all the things that are most important to you – and what you find can be rejuvenating by reminding you of your younger self and the things you’ll enjoy rediscovering.

5 Explore Your Local Area

Round-the-world trips or luxury cruises are the big retirement cliché, but there’s also a whole world to explore around where you live. If you’ve been working 9 to 5 or beyond, your universe has probably shrunk to your home, workplace and commuting route. There is almost certainly somewhere that’ll wow you less than an hour’s drive from your front door – go and find it. Search out forgotten footpaths, hidden woodlands, secluded river walks and cross-country trails. Whether you like to stroll sedately or hike at pace, there’s bound to be a walking group local to you.

6 Write! Even if You’re the Only One Who Reads Your Work

Finally, there is time to write that book you always wanted to, or to set up and manage a blog, write articles to be published in magazines or elsewhere, poems or your memoirs. If writing a book sounds a step too far, why not start a gratitude journal! It is a great way to stay mindful and in the moment. It is the place where you can write down your reflections about what’s positive in your life and what you are grateful for every day. You can also play games at machine a sous en ligne to get excited a bit.

7 Social Organizations

Join meet-up groups that are geared to certain interests or populations. Clubs centered around books, chess, astronomy, or gem and mineral exploration are great opportunities, and so are dating sites. One of the hardest things about making the transition to retirement is coming to terms with our changing social circumstances. For many of us, our family members were the most important people in our lives for decades. Even if we still live close to our kids and have a good relationship with our grandkids, there is no denying that our social world shifts significantly in our 50s and 60s.

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